Stone Creek Landscaping

August is here and there are still items to be checked off on your lawn and maintenance checklist. Here are a few of the things you should be doing this month, according to SouthernLiving.com.

Trim

August is the last month for heavy pruning of hedges and evergreens before they go dormant in November and December. If you trim too late, it could cause new growth that won’t harden off in time for a freeze and will be killed.

Lawn Care

Watch for brown patches, which is aa common lawn disease that thrives in hot weather. It starts as an oddly shaped spot of brown grass that soon enlarges into a big dead patch. You want to treat the spot, and the healthy grass surrounding it, according to directions with a liquid or granular fungicide.

Gardens

We are sure you have been enjoying your homegrown veggies all summer and have been picking them as they produce. However, beans, squash, okra, and others can grow hard if left on the plant too long. And if the seeds inside them start to mature, the plants may stop producing. Pro tip: the best time to pick your produce is early in the morning.

Remember Stone Creek Landscaping offers a full service maintenance program that will protect and keep your property looking its best. From deadheading flowers, trimming shrubs, removing debris, and keeping grass well manicured, we are clearly committed to you and your investment.

Source: Southern Living

Yes, it’s hot, but there is still so much that can and needs to be done for your garden and lawn. It might even be a great idea to schedule time to check of must do’s to help you remember all the chores you want to accomplish. Not sure what those must-do’s are? Let us help with these tips from Garden and Design.

Add colorful containers

“Keep annual containers looking their best with regular watering, fertilizing and deadheading. In mid-summer, cut back trailing annuals such as petunias and million bells by half and give regular feedings of water-soluble bloom booster fertilizer for a new flush of color. Replace tired-looking plants with new ones for an updated look. Move containers into mixed borders where there are holes or gaps for an element of surprise.”

Be waterwise

“Mulch beds with organic matter to suppress weeds and help retain moisture. Use drip irrigation when possible, and water early or late in the day—particularly when using sprinklers or watering wands—to minimize evaporation.”

Keep cool 

“Think of ways to cool off your yard. Plants are nature’s own air conditioner; areas under trees can be up to 20 degrees cooler than adjacent sunny spots. Plant a tree to shade the patio or deck, and locate benches and chairs underneath existing trees. Place a fountain, pool or small portable water feature near your patio for a cooling evaporation effect, and the soothing sound of moving water. Build an arbor and plant quick-growing vines at the base, or install a shade cloth.”

Take note

“Now’s the time to assess the garden. Make a list of what needs to be divided or replaced, and take a few snapshots on your phone as a visual reminder. Note if a plant is too big or small for a particular spot, and when you see varieties that might work better together. Fall and spring are the best times to move plants around, when the weather is cooler.”

Stone Creek Landscaping

Need an extra hand with your yard? Let us handle it for you. Stone Creek Landscaping is your complete landscape solution. Whether you’re looking for maintenance, design and install, or just a splash of seasonal color, our skilled and professional crews are here to help.

We offer a full service maintenance program that will protect and keep your property looking its best. From deadheading flowers, trimming shrubs, removing debris, and keeping grass well manicured, we are clearly committed to you and your investment.

Source of article: GardenandDesign.com

Summer temperatures have arrived, and it’s not even truly summer. In our last post we discussed taking care of your lawn in the heat, and this week we are following up with other tips for making the most of your yard in June.

Watering

According to SouthernLiving.com, June continues to be an important much to pay attention to watering. Give special attention to containers, planters and hanging baskets as they will dry out much faster in warmer temperatures. They recommend watering plants at dawn and dusk to reduce water loss from evaporation. As you add to your garden, you will need to water them more than established areas.

Indoor Plants

“Place houseplants outside in a shady location to enjoy the fresh air and rejuvenate. Water regularly, and feed with an all-purpose (20-20-20) water-soluble fertilizer to encourage growth.”

Mulch

“Apply extra pine straw or shredded bark mulch around newly planted trees and shrubs to better transition these plants into your garden. The extra mulch will reduce water loss and heat stress to the new roots.”

Stone Creek Landscaping

Need an extra hand with your yard in the summer heat? Let us handle it for you. Stone Creek Landscaping is your complete landscape solution. Whether you’re looking for maintenance, design and install, or just a splash of seasonal color, our skilled and professional crews are here to help.

We offer a full service maintenance program that will protect and keep your property looking its best. From deadheading flowers, trimming shrubs, removing debris, and keeping grass well manicured, we are clearly committed to you and your investment.

With summer like temperatures approaching this weekend, it’s never too early to start thinking about lawn care during the extreme summer heat.

Don’t Cut it Too Short

One common mistake made is cutting a lawn too short. According to Yard Care by Toro, “if a lawn is cut too short, it reduces the plants’ ability to produce energy for growth. When cut at the proper height, however, grass develops stronger roots that support more vigorous plants that are more tolerant of stress. Keep in mind that different varieties of grass have different growth habits that directly relate to mowing heights. For example, cool season grass and warm season grass types require somewhat different maintenance techniques. Research which cutting height is right for your lawn.”

Water

The best way to beat the heat is by watering. A good recommendation is one inch of water per week. This amount helps to keep turf grass healthy. And remember once you start watering, don’t stop. Less frequent, deeper waterings are better than frequent shallow ones. Watering for longer periods of time less often will promote deeper roots, greater drought tolerance and less maintenance. Water your lawn in the morning when it is cool to allow more water to soak into the ground rather than evaporate. Avoid watering in the evening to prevent fungus and disease.*

Do Not Bag Grass Clippings

Yard Care also suggests returning clippings to the lawn by using a mulching mower. Clippings are actually beneficial to the lawn, because they act as a slow-release fertilizer for the plant as they decompose. It is important to aim the clippings away from streets, storm drains, and bodies of water.

Stone Creek Landscaping

Don’t have time to take care of your lawn? Let us handle it for you. Stone Creek Landscaping is your complete landscape solution regardless of your property’s current condition.  Whether you’re looking for maintenance, design and install, or just a splash of seasonal color, our skilled and professional crews are here to help.

We offer a full service maintenance program that will protect and keep your property looking its best.  From deadheading flowers, trimming shrubs, removing debris, and keeping grass well manicured, we are clearly committed to you and your investment.

 

*Source Gertens.com

 

Daffodil or Jonquil? A very common question when it comes to gardening and one we hope we can help answer today.

Jonquils and daffodils are both classed as Narcissus. However, daffodil bulbs are typically barely scented while jonquils are very fragrant.

According to the American Daffodil Society, a jonquil is one of the 13 divisions of daffodils. Bloom color, size and shape, as well as foliage type, flowering schedule and number of blossoms to a stem, determine the classifications of more than 25,000 registered hybrids. All of these perennials fall under the Narcissus genus. The flowers, grown from bulbs, have the advantages of minimal care requirements and a year-to-year increase in plant matter.

Jonquils have slender leaves that round on the tips while daffodils sport slim sword-tipped foliage. Jonquil stems are hollow and usually shorter than daffodil varieties. They tend to have clusters of flowers on the stems and a delicate fragrance. In flower shape and hue, they are very similar to daffodil bulbs and most gardeners simply don’t differentiate. The length of the corolla is smaller in jonquils than daffodils. Additionally, jonquils only grow in yellow hues while daffodils may be found in white, peach, pink and a variety of other colors. The cultivation and planting of both bulbs is the same and the presentation of a golden sea of flowers is just as pleasing no matter which species you choose.”

Still not sure what to plant? Why not let us take care of all your gardening needs. Simply call Stone Creek Landscaping today at 404-647-4297 for a free estimate. 

Lawn maintenance can be an overwhelming project to some. If you are one of those our first tip is call us! However, if you are looking for preventative measures you can take on your own, here are some tips from the University of Georgia’s Extension Office.

First, you want to make sure you properly prepare the soil for successful turf grass establishment. It is recommended that you take soil samples to determine proper lime and nutrient requirements.

Next, make sure you are planting a turf grass that is good for your climate. For advice, visit www.GeorgiaTurf.com, the University of Georgia’s turfgrass website.

It is highly recommended that you purchase your sod or sprigs from a reputable producer.

Purchasing tip:

“Before planting, consider the time of year and the remaining length of the growing season. With adequate moisture and time, most turfgrasses will recover from the shock of harvest, transport and planting.”

Always maintain the recommended mowing height and be sure to follow proper irrigation practices.

Mowing tip:

“Mow turfgrasses often enough so that not more than 30 percent (1/3) of the leaf blade is removed in a single mowing. If more plant material is removed, the grass can become stressed and more susceptible to disease causing organisms and insects.”

These are only a few tips that can be found on the UGA website. And for a complete lawn care service, call us at Stone Creek Landscaping at 404-647-4297.

Stone Creek is your complete landscape solution regardless of your property’s current condition.  Whether you’re looking for maintenance, design and install, or just a splash of seasonal color, our skilled and professional crews are here to help.

We offer a full service maintenance program that will protect and keep your property looking its best.  From deadheading flowers, trimming shrubs, removing debris, and keeping grass well manicured, we are clearly committed to you and your investment.

In the South the temperatures are beginning to fall, and so are the leaves.

During this time, it is really important that you remove those leaves as quickly as possible. A thick layer of leaves will suffocate your lawn, not allowing adequate amounts of air, nutrients, and sunlight to reach your grass.

According to Spruce.com, raking the foliage truly is not just for tidiness, but also for lawn health. Here are 5 reasons you have probably heard about removing leaves, and guess what? The claims are all true!

1.That lawns, too, have to “breathe.” – True

2. The lawn will be smothered in a thick layer of unshredded leaves is left on top of them over the winter. – True

3. That such a layer can invite pests and diseases and can cause serious problems like snow mold and brown patch. – True

4. That such a layer forms a barrier that blocks water, nutrients, and a healthy air flow from getting down to the root system of your grass. – True

5. That, if the leaves are matted down, they can even keep new grass blades from emerging next spring. – True

So, if you find yourself with extra time this weekend, you just might want to tackle this project. If not, you can always call us at Stone Creek Landscaping, your full service lawn maintenance and landscapers!

 

During the fall months there is a lot that can be done in one’s yard. From lawn care to planting vegetables and flowers, September can be quiet the busy yard month.

Lawn Care

September and October are excellent times to reseed and repair lawns. According to Better Homes & Gardens, “you’ll need to water daily until the seed has sprouted and established. Wait to plant grass seed until October in warmer regions when there are cooler temperatures and rain.”

Vegetable Planting

It is also a great time to plant veggies: In the Middle, Lower, and Coastal South, now is the time to plant your fall vegetables. Set out transplants of lettuce, collards, kale, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, and arugula. Southern Living reminds that if you are planting on a budget, sow seeds of lettuce, arugula, collards, beets, and radishes. They also offer a great tip of even planting these veggies in pots if you find yourself with no room.

Caring for flowers

Better Homes & Gardens also suggests, “when annuals — especially petunias — or perennials get leggy or scraggly, cut them back by one-third or more. It will not only make them look neater, but it also will often encourage a fresh flush of growth and/or bloom. Continue to fertilize containers containing annuals and perennials. Halt fertilizing of perennials. It will only encourage them to grow throughout the winter when they need to rest for best overall health.”

Need help preparing your lawn this fall? Call the experts at Stone Creek Landscaping. We are here to assist with all of your lawn and landscaping needs.

Fall is in the air. Well it’s kinda in the air as the temperatures are a tad bit lower. It’s not time to break out the sweaters, but there is college football this weekend! So yes, fall will soon arrive, and with it comes the planting of beautiful fall flowers.

Better Homes & Gardens knows everyone will plant the typical southern flowers … mums, pansies, violas, cabbages and kale, but they have some not so common suggestions as well. Here are a few of their favorites:

Purple-leaf wintercreeper (Euonymus fortunei ‘Coloratus’) is a low-growing groundcover with purple-red fall foliage.  Learn more about wintercreeper.

Loropetalum chinense ‘Razzleberri’ has burgundy foliage year-round with occasional shocking-pink, spidery flowers.

Rockspray (Cotoneaster horizontalis) produces glossy green leaves that turn red in fall along with bright red berries.  Learn more about cotoneaster.

Virginia sweetspire (Itea virginica ‘Henry’s Garnet’) contributes brilliant red-purple fall foliage on arching branches.  Learn more about Virginia sweetspire.

Encore azaleas (Rhododendron hybrids) are a surefire hit. ‘Autumn Embers’, for example, features reddish-orange blooms that combine well with nature’s autumn cloak.

Stone Creek Landscaping is here to help you with all of your fall planting. From flowers, to shrubs or even a complete landscaping overhaul, call us today for an estimate. Stone Creek is your complete landscape solution regardless of your property’s current condition.  Whether you’re looking for maintenance, design and install, or just a splash of seasonal color, our skilled and professional crews are here to help.

The thermostat says 92, but with the humidity it feels more like 102. The heat is dangerous to us, but it can be just as harmful to your grass. To help maintain your grass during the brutal summer heat, we have some tips for you.

Do not cut your grass too short

One common mistake we can make is cutting a lawn too short. “If a lawn is cut too short, it reduces the plants’ ability to produce energy for growth. When cut at the proper height, however, grass develops stronger roots that support more vigorous plants that are more tolerant of stress. Keep in mind that different varieties of grass have different growth habits that directly relate to mowing heights. For example, cool season grass and warm season grass types require somewhat different maintenance techniques. Research which cutting height is right for your lawn.”

What is the correct height to cut my grass?

“When deciding on the correct height to cut your grass, it is important to also remember the “one-third” rule: never remove more than one-third of the grass height at one time. By doing so, the lawn is kept cooler because less plant tissue is removed. In fact, cool season grass types actually benefit in the heat of the summer by setting the blade higher. If a lawn is normally cut at 2.5 inches, for example, increasing it to 3 inches in the heat of summer will come with many benefits.”

Water your grass in the morning hours

Always remember to set your sprinklers to water your lawn in the morning hours, never in the heat of the day. And although it is important to water your lawn during, do not over water. Lawns actually only need one-inch of water per week, including rainfall.

Don’t bag those grass clippings

“Return clippings to the lawn by using a mulching mower. Clippings are actually beneficial to the lawn, as they act as a slow-release fertilizer for the plant as they decompose. It is important to aim the clippings away from streets, storm drains, and bodies of water.”

“When near bodies of water, do bag the clippings within one or two mower widths of the water’s edge to reduce pollution of streams and lakes from the nutrients released from decomposing leaf tissue.”

For more information on lawn care, call the professionals at Stone Creek Landscaping to answer all of your questions.

Source: yardcare.com

Summer in the South means heat, and not all flowers can withstand the direct sun. If you are still looking for a few more summer flowers* in your yard, might we suggest:

Marigolds

“These gold-, copper-, and brass-colored flowers are popular, because they’re super easy to care for and will keep your garden looking bright and happy all summer long.”

Daylillies

Sometimes called the perfect perennial, this multi-flowered stems (called scapes) grows in all types of soil, with very little care required. Low maintenance is something we can all get behind!

Phlox

“Flowering fields of wild phlox inspired the so-called “Pink Moon,” so it’s no surprise the low-growing plant acts as a great ground-cover.”

Asters (pictured above)

“The star-like blooms add splashes of purple, pink, and violet toward the end of summer.”

Hydrangeas

“From late spring to early autumn, this stunning flower is bound to steal the show in your garden. Fun fact: Their color varies based on the aluminum ions in the soil.”

Need more ideas for summer flowers? Visit Stone Creek Landscaping. We are your complete landscape solution. Whether you’re looking for maintenance, design and install, or just a splash of seasonal color, our skilled and professional crews are here to help.

 

*Source GoodHousekeeping.com

 

Summer is here and the Georgia temperatures have begun to feel a lot more like Florida. This heat is having an impact on yards across the state, especially the grass we grow in our lawns. There are so many choices to make when deciding on which grass to seed our yard with in such a warm climate. How can one decide?
According to Pennington.com, in our area and even the Gulf Coast, Bahiagrass and Centipede grass are common. These grasses are extremely drought and heat tolerant, and they stand up to the region’s climate and water restrictions.

“Bahiagrass provides homeowners in the Deep South and Coastal regions with low-maintenance, all-purpose lawns. More coarse than any cool-season grass, Bahiagrass has good disease- and pest-resistant qualities, establishes easily and offers outstanding drought and heat tolerance. Sun-loving Pennington Pensacola Bahiagrass is perfect for the Southern Coastal Plain and Gulf Coast. Lower growing and low-maintenance Pennington Argentine Bahiagrasswins favor from Florida through the Texas coast, as it teams finer texture, improved density and deeper color with durability and drought resistance.”

Another popular grass is the centipede grass which earns praise for its low and slow growth, medium texture and its medium- to light-green color. This low-maintenance, warm-season grass “out competes weeds and tolerates nutrient-poor soil, so less mowing and less fertilizer are needed.”

Pennington also explains that centipede grasses, prefer full sun but tolerate more shade than Bermudagrass. “Centipede grasses also lack a true dormant period, so they stay green nearly year-round except in extremely cold conditions. Centipede’s low growth helps it tolerate drought well, and its denseness helps it endure foot traffic.”

For more great grass tips, visit our site, Stone Creek Landscaping. We are your complete landscape solution. Whether you’re looking for maintenance, design and install, or just a splash of seasonal color, our skilled and professional crews are here to help.