Stone Creek Landscaping

It has been quite a summer as the heat has been relentless, but soon Fall will be here. As you begin looking at what needs to be done to your yard in September we wanted to share a few suggestions found at SouthernLiving.com.

Time to Plant

Now is the perfect time to plant that fall vegetable garden. Items you should consider growing include “radishes, spinach, lettuce, mustard greens, kale, and other leafy crops that like autumn’s cool weather. Now is also the time to assemble containers of ornamentals for the crisp days that we pray lie ahead. Combine annuals such as pansies, violas, and ornamental cabbage and kale with fancy-leaved hardy perennials like heuchera, golden Japanese sweet flag, rue, variegated ivy, and ‘Tricolor’ common sage.”

Fertilize

Now is definitely the time to feed such grasses like tall fescue, Kentucky bluegrass and perennial ryegrass. These types of grasses are green throughout the winter. It is important that you choose the correct lawn fertilizer for your type of grass.

Water

Although August has been an extremely dry month, September is not typically any better. Remember to soak the roots of trees and shrubs this month as well as any newly planted flowers and/or vegetables.

Stone Creek is your complete landscape solution regardless of your property’s current condition.  Whether you’re looking for maintenance, design and install, or just a splash of seasonal color, our skilled and professional crews are here to help.

We offer a full service maintenance program that will protect and keep your property looking its best.  From deadheading flowers, trimming shrubs, removing debris, and keeping grass well manicured, we are clearly committed to you and your investment.

 

 

 

Daffodil or Jonquil? A very common question when it comes to gardening and one we hope we can help answer today.

Jonquils and daffodils are both classed as Narcissus. However, daffodil bulbs are typically barely scented while jonquils are very fragrant.

According to the American Daffodil Society, a jonquil is one of the 13 divisions of daffodils. Bloom color, size and shape, as well as foliage type, flowering schedule and number of blossoms to a stem, determine the classifications of more than 25,000 registered hybrids. All of these perennials fall under the Narcissus genus. The flowers, grown from bulbs, have the advantages of minimal care requirements and a year-to-year increase in plant matter.

Jonquils have slender leaves that round on the tips while daffodils sport slim sword-tipped foliage. Jonquil stems are hollow and usually shorter than daffodil varieties. They tend to have clusters of flowers on the stems and a delicate fragrance. In flower shape and hue, they are very similar to daffodil bulbs and most gardeners simply don’t differentiate. The length of the corolla is smaller in jonquils than daffodils. Additionally, jonquils only grow in yellow hues while daffodils may be found in white, peach, pink and a variety of other colors. The cultivation and planting of both bulbs is the same and the presentation of a golden sea of flowers is just as pleasing no matter which species you choose.”

Still not sure what to plant? Why not let us take care of all your gardening needs. Simply call Stone Creek Landscaping today at 404-647-4297 for a free estimate. 

Roses are a beautiful addition to any flower garden, however many are afraid the upkeep will be too hard to maintain gorgeous blooms. This actually not true, and pretty much anyone can grow roses.

According to GardenDesign.com, you should “plant your roses in a sunny location with good drainage. Fertilize them regularly for impressive flowers. Water them evenly to keep the soil moist. Prune established rose bushes in early spring. And watch for diseases like powdery mildew or black spot.”

Not sure what type of rose to plant? Almanac.com has made it easier to learn about all types of rose bushes.

“Rose bushes come in a variety of forms, from climbing roses to miniature rose plants, blooming mainly in early summer and fall. One way to group roses into classes is according to their date of introduction:

  • Old roses—also called “old-fashioned roses” and “heirloom roses”—are those introduced prior to 1867. These are the lush, invariably fragrant roses found in old masters’ paintings. There are hundreds of old rose varieties—whose hardiness varies—providing choices for both warm and mild climates.
  • Modern hybrid roses, introduced after 1867, are sturdy, long-blooming, extremely hardy and disease-resistant, and bred for color, shape, size, and fragrance. The hybrid tea roses, with one large flower on a long cutting stem,are one of the most popular hybrids.
  • Species, or wild roses, are those that have been growing wild for many thousands of years. These wild roses have been adapted to modern gardens and usually bloom from spring to early summer. Most species roses have single blossoms.

The Old Farmer’s Almanac also gave these great tips on planting roses.

PLANTING ROSES

  • Wear sturdy gloves to protect your hands from prickly thorns. Have a hose or bucket of water and all your planting tools nearby.
  • Soak bare-root roses in a bucket of water for 8-12 hours before planting.
  • Prune each cane back to 3-5 buds per cane. Any cane thinner than a pencil should be removed.
  • If planting container grown roses, loosen the roots before planting.
  • When you plant the rose, be sure to dig a much bigger hole than you think you need (for most types, the planting hole should be about 15 to 18 inches wide) and add plenty of organic matter such as compost or aged manure.
  • Soak the newly planted rose with water.
  • Mound up loose soil around the canes to protect the rose while it acclimates to its new site.
  • Some old-timers recommend placing a 4-inch square of gypsum wallboard and a 16-penny nail in the hole to provide calcium and iron, both appreciated by roses.
  • Don’t crowd the roses if you plan to plant more than one rose bush. Roses should be planted about two-thirds of the expected height apart. Old garden roses will need more space, while miniature roses can be planted closer. Space between plants allows for good air circulation.

 Source: The Old Farmer’s Almanac

If you are having issues with your flower garden, call the experts at Stone Creek Landscaping at 404-647-4297. Their experts can help maintain your current flower gardens and provide landscaping ideas for future gardens.